Please don’t walk by on the other side

Suicide is one of the last taboos. So much so, that some internet service providers (ISPs) block websites that name it, for fear they are pro-suicide or that just mentioning the word may somehow encourage it. Even my little blogsite has been affected. Thanks to those who told me about two ISPs who were blocking me, and to BT who fixed it fast. And thumbs up to Virgin Media whose initial excuses were unimpressive, but who sorted it out eventually.

I was thinking of the taboo of suicide when I met some wonderful people in Devon recently. Some had been directly affected by suicide, such as the couple who lost their 18 year old son in 2011 and now campaign to raise awareness, and promote a young people’s helpline and two excellent training courses, Safe Talk and ASIST via suicide prevention charity Papyrus. Some were like me and experience suicidal thoughts from time to time. And some were just good, kind people who help others in their chosen careers or as volunteers. They are all part of the South West Suicide Prevention Collaborative.

I shared some of my personal story with them and why I believe now more than ever that preventing suicide is everyone’s business. It is definitely not just the responsibility of staff who work in mental services, who can get blamed for not keeping someone alive, rather than praised for all the times that they have. Staff need support at such times because they feel devastated at the loss of a patient who they care about deeply. How can we expect them to be compassionate to others if we treat them with so little compassion?

Actually, this applies to all of us. Telling people who work in public services to be more compassionate while treating them without dignity, respect or kindness is the ultimate irony. And yet it is played out in many places every day. Including much of the media.

I said something at the event that isn’t currently fashionable. I don’t think it is is possible to prevent every death by suicide. But I do think that we can do very much more IF we make suicide prevention the business of families, friends, neighbours, schools, workplaces, all public services rather than just the obvious ones, the media, shops, cafes, bars, the voluntary sector, faith groups, social groups, sports clubs…everyone. And if we talk about it with more understanding and less rush to judgement, I believe we will gradually lose the taboo. But we still have far to go.

It isn’t just those of us who experience mental illness who think about killing ourselves. Death of a loved one, job loss, other sorts of loss, crippling debt, loneliness, isolation or an overwhelming sense of hopelessness about the future can all be causes. One of the people at the Devon conference spoke bravely about the corrosive impact of the downturn and benefit changes on those who are least well-off.

Only those who have been directly touched by suicide can possibly know just how raw and awful it feels. It is a grief like no other, because of the guilt and the shame that is still associated with it. I don’t get cross about those who still describe the act as “committing” suicide. They usually mean no harm. Suicide hasn’t been a crime since 1961, but we have some way to go to incorporate that change into our values, attitudes, behaviours and language.

I have spent a lot of my life being ashamed of having occasional suicidal thoughts. I was lucky to learn about Samaritans via an article in Reader’s Digest when I was 15, the same year I saw my first psychiatrist. Their kind, wise volunteers have helped me several times in the past. I even became one myself for a while in my early 20s. But I was going through a rough patch and left without explaining why.

Now it’s payback time. I’m doing a big bike ride to raise money for Samaritans. Apart from a handful of staff at their HQ, all Samaritans are volunteers. Like the two lovely women who spoke at the Devon event about the work they are doing in local schools to raise awareness and offer support in the event of a death by suicide. I am donating my £500 fee from the event this week towards my fundraising target. Every penny I raise will go to keep local branches across the country running and to pay for the calls desperate people need to make. I have a big birthday in August. I’m asking my family and friends to make donations in lieu of presents. I can’t think of a better way to celebrate reaching 60.

We can all help one another. That man sitting on the station platform all alone? How long has he been there? Could you get over your reluctance to appear interfering and take a moment to ask him how he is? What about the elderly neighbour whose partner has recently died and who hasn’t been seen for a while? The young person at work who takes frequent days off? The friend who has been made redundant? Even the chief executive who has apparently made a mistake and is getting a mauling via social media. We can all do our bit to be kind, because that is all it might take to save a life.

And as we say at Grassroots, the wonderful suicide prevention charity in Sussex of which I am a trustee, here’s to life.

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One comment

  1. The libraries too, Lisa, do a really useful job at supporting people going through all sorts of otherwise invisible personal events. Since retiring as a nurse and health visitor I have been running a local community library, open to everyone at whatever level they wish to engage but often a first port of call for those undergoing traumatic changes in their lives as well as those who live permanently on the ‘threshold’. Thank you for acknowledging your own story in this article; if you can do it, it opens doors for all of us. I may have reduced my salary by 75% but, whilst austerity allows, I am proud and grateful to use my personal and professional experience as part of offering a truly egalitarian and non-judgemental service to all members of the community, wherever they find themselves on the journey. So many ‘good news’ stories.

    Like

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