It could be you

I’ve had a mixed week. Yesterday I was in Leeds with people who mainly work in the local NHS, voluntary sector and local authorities and share an interest in helping vulnerable people. The conference was called #puttingPeoplefirst. It was enlightening and uplifting. I observed a groundswell of support for a different way of being at work, where people bring their whole and unique selves to bear on issues that matter, where failure is seen as an opportunity for learning rather than a weakness to be vilified,  and where treating patients/clients/service users with deep and real compassion is underpinned by working with love and compassion with one another.

Sounds a bit wooly and Buddhist for you? Then listen up. There is an increasing body of evidence that staff, from cleaners to chief executives, who are encouraged to operate with integrity and openness provide better, safer, kinder care. And this stuff isn’t new. Thank you @jackielynton for reminding us of our old friend Donabedian, who wrote wisely about improving quality before anyone else had thought of it, and said that it started with love.

If you don’t already follow @johnwalsh88 on Twitter or read his Yes To Life blog, and you like the sound of the conference, I’d encourage you to do so. I cannot thank John enough for inviting me. Or to the other organisers and speakers and to everyone there who was so honest and kind, including when they challenged one another.

Meanwhile, in another part of the forest,  a senior public servant has selflessly stepped down from a job they openly loved despite having done absolutely nothing whatsoever wrong, and indeed a considerable amount right, in order to meet the political ends of people who appear simply to be throwing their weight about. And is being vilified online for it. What does that say to the thousands this person leads? Are they at similar expedient risk?

And in yet another part of the forest (I do like that saying, please tell me if I overuse it) senior people who should know better have been talking about “Never Events” as if by giving something a threatening – sounding name, it will stop it from happening. Actually, what it does is make staff very, very scared. And scared people are less creative and more likely to cover bad things up and to go off sick with stress. Or worse, come to work when they aren’t psychologically fit enough to care for themselves, never mind others.

Here’s a precis of what I said at the conference about authentic leadership:

  1. Bad things happen. Good leaders look after their people at such times. We live in a blame culture so this is very, very hard.
  2. The more rules and procedures you impose, the less creative and compassionate your people will become. Resisting the external demands to introduce even more is also very hard.
  3. We performance manage and inspect individual organisations at the expense of the good of the collective system, and the patients who struggle across the bits of the system. Moving to a more collective approach is a goal we could all agree on. But what about accountability, comes the cry. Or, who would we blame when things go wrong?
  4. There is a leader in all of us, whether we are a patient or family member, work on reception or sit at the board room table. Work hard, if needs be against the grain, to be defined by what you do best, not by what scares you most.
  5. Bring all of you to what you do. It took me far too long to learn that being all of me, including the bits I was less proud of, even ashamed of, made me a more authentic leader. Don’t try to hide your imperfections like I did. It’s an added burden when things are hard enough already.
  6. Many people are privately saying that everything now isn’t right, and some things intended to improve care are actually conspiring to make it less compassionate and safe. If you agree, find the courage to speak truth to power, which is what I am trying to do in this blog.

If you are in a leadership role and you see a colleague who is having a tough time, please don’t metaphorically cross to the other side of the road as though they had some toxic disease you might catch. And please don’t believe the shit you read online or even join in the anonymous bear – baiting that passes for acceptable comment these days. Instead, offer them your genuine support.

Because you never know, one day, it could be you.

 

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8 comments

  1. Thanks Lisa, this was forwarded to me by another helpful health care radical on a day I chose to resign from my position as a senior social worker involved in Oncology care for the last 10 years. I appreciate your honesty and dedication to improving health.

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  2. Perhaps your blog underlines the reasons why people who work with vulnerable people – healthcare workers, charity workers and so forth – feel so strongly that the social safety net is so crucial. If you work in these fields, you see people who would never have expected to fall off their perches, as it were; who have been struck down by mental or physical illness (including addiction or its effects) quite unexpectedly.

    Time and again we see people who clearly think that this could only happen to the feckless or irresponsible, so society really doesn’t need to provide resources to sort out their self-induced problems; and we know that they are wrong.

    Of course, we don’t all agree that the answer is to ensure society demands that we all pay enough taxes to provide the insurance necessary should it happen to us; but, for myself, I find this conclusion inescapable.

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